News

American Indian Alaska Native State Plan Convening

Last week, I had the opportunity to gather with the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs, and members of the surrounding community to talk about the State’s American Indian Alaska Native State Plan (AI/AN Plan). I was joined by leaders from the Early Learning Division, Department of Education, Youth Development Division, and the Higher Education Coordinating Commission. Attendees included parents, community members, students, school leaders, and educators.

IMG_7171

The Chief Education Office convened the group in partnership with the Oregon Department of Education, as part of a series of conversations with all nine federally recognized, sovereign tribes in Oregon over the next two years. Each conversation is designed to support communities in co-constructing local strategies, developing new relationships, and strengthening current partnerships to make progress towards key goals in the Plan.

As state leaders our role was to listen, as the nearly 100 attendees shared the assets that already exist within the region that could be leveraged to improve access, opportunities and outcomes for students in, and around the Warm Springs community.

——Lindsey Capps, Chief Education Officer

American Indian Alaska Native State Plan Convening

Last week, I had the opportunity to gather with the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs, and members of the surrounding community to talk about the State’s American Indian Alaska Native State Plan (AI/AN Plan). I was joined by leaders from the Early Learning Division, Department of Education, Youth Development Division, and the Higher Education Coordinating Commission. Attendees included parents, community members, students, school leaders, and educators.

IMG_7171

The Chief Education Office convened the group in partnership with the Oregon Department of Education, as part of a series of conversations with all nine federally recognized, sovereign tribes in Oregon over the next two years. Each conversation is designed to support communities in co-constructing local strategies, developing new relationships, and strengthening current partnerships to make progress towards key goals in the Plan.

As state leaders our role was to listen, as the nearly 100 attendees shared the assets that already exist within the region that could be leveraged to improve access, opportunities and outcomes for students in, and around the Warm Springs community.

——Lindsey Capps, Chief Education Officer

Transformational change is possible


Transformational change is possible
Six essential elements for lasting change
by Liz Weaver
Working in complexity can surface some tough challenges, but they are not insurmountable.

The problems our communities face are complex and challenging. We have been lulled into a sense of complacency by trying to find micro-solutions to complex issues. Communities have compartmentalized how services are delivered. The charitable and non-profit sector in Canada is the second largest in the world with an estimated170,000 organizations providing services and programs to communities and citizens, and yet, true change seems impossible.

Transformational change is possible


Transformational change is possible
Six essential elements for lasting change
by Liz Weaver
Working in complexity can surface some tough challenges, but they are not insurmountable.

The problems our communities face are complex and challenging. We have been lulled into a sense of complacency by trying to find micro-solutions to complex issues. Communities have compartmentalized how services are delivered. The charitable and non-profit sector in Canada is the second largest in the world with an estimated170,000 organizations providing services and programs to communities and citizens, and yet, true change seems impossible.

Second-Generation Collective Impact

Collective impact efforts that go the distance align public and private resources, and dedicate themselves to keeping their networks engaged and focused on results.

What separates collective impact efforts that spin their wheels from those that continue to gain traction for years to come?

After working on multiple collective initiatives over the years—including efforts to reduce poverty, improve workforce development and early childhood development systems, and end homelessness—as well as regional collaborations, it’s clear that the idea of shared management and collective commitments is attractive to those working to bring about social change. Yet managing one that has true staying power is remarkably challenging.

Read complete article

Second-Generation Collective Impact

Collective impact efforts that go the distance align public and private resources, and dedicate themselves to keeping their networks engaged and focused on results.

What separates collective impact efforts that spin their wheels from those that continue to gain traction for years to come?

After working on multiple collective initiatives over the years—including efforts to reduce poverty, improve workforce development and early childhood development systems, and end homelessness—as well as regional collaborations, it’s clear that the idea of shared management and collective commitments is attractive to those working to bring about social change. Yet managing one that has true staying power is remarkably challenging.

Read complete article

Invitation to participate in Education Focus Groups

Invitation to participate in Education Focus Groups

CoActive Connections is launching the Poverty Education for Oregonians Project.

We are working to develop specific curriculum modules for educators as an important piece of this project. We are currently seeking education professionals, administrators and teachers from across Oregon to participate in online focus groups, March 10, 2016, and March 15, 2016, from 3:30 to 5:00 pm for each. By sharing your thoughts, experiences and opinions you will inform and expand our education focused curriculum on poverty awareness and improve outcomes statewide.

The text based online discussion will be with approximately a dozen other participants and moderated by a professional researcher. Your identity and participation will be anonymous.

To inform the curriculum, we are looking for a wide and diverse representation of the education experience across Oregon. If you are interested in participating, a survey will be sent to you once we receive your contact information submitted on this form.

Selected participants will receive another email from CoActive Connections within the week with additional instructions. You will be invited to participate in a 90-minute online discussion, for which you will receive $75.00 for your valuable time and opinions.

Fill out and submit application HERE

Invitation to participate in Education Focus Groups

Invitation to participate in Education Focus Groups

CoActive Connections is launching the Poverty Education for Oregonians Project.

We are working to develop specific curriculum modules for educators as an important piece of this project. We are currently seeking education professionals, administrators and teachers from across Oregon to participate in online focus groups, March 10, 2016, and March 15, 2016, from 3:30 to 5:00 pm for each. By sharing your thoughts, experiences and opinions you will inform and expand our education focused curriculum on poverty awareness and improve outcomes statewide.

The text based online discussion will be with approximately a dozen other participants and moderated by a professional researcher. Your identity and participation will be anonymous.

To inform the curriculum, we are looking for a wide and diverse representation of the education experience across Oregon. If you are interested in participating, a survey will be sent to you once we receive your contact information submitted on this form.

Selected participants will receive another email from CoActive Connections within the week with additional instructions. You will be invited to participate in a 90-minute online discussion, for which you will receive $75.00 for your valuable time and opinions.

Fill out and submit application HERE

STEM education hub created in East County

STEM education hub created in East County
as reported in the Portland Tribune on February 22, 2016

A newly created East County science and technology educational “hub” recently received $124,882 in state funds to work toward improving science education in the area.

The hubs are intended to leverage and build on STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) assets that already exist in the community, rather than creating new programs.

The hubs already exist in other areas in Oregon.

STEM hubs focus on teachers learning the best practices for STEM instruction, increasing hands-on learning experiences for students both in and out of school as well as student awareness of STEM employment opportunities.

Read complete article

STEM education hub created in East County

STEM education hub created in East County
as reported in the Portland Tribune on February 22, 2016

A newly created East County science and technology educational “hub” recently received $124,882 in state funds to work toward improving science education in the area.

The hubs are intended to leverage and build on STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) assets that already exist in the community, rather than creating new programs.

The hubs already exist in other areas in Oregon.

STEM hubs focus on teachers learning the best practices for STEM instruction, increasing hands-on learning experiences for students both in and out of school as well as student awareness of STEM employment opportunities.

Read complete article